hero sword

“Let’s Talk About Me” Why being the hero is killing your business

by Juan Santiago

Have you ever met someone who couldn’t stop talking about themselves? Frustrating, isn’t it? Now imagine the same scenario in an important sales meeting, presentation, or a negotiation. Would you buy from this person? I thought so.

Sadly, many professionals suffer from this need to be the protagonist in every conversation. And in this article, you’ll understand that to succeed you’ve got to be the guide, not the hero.

Being the “HERO” in the Business World.

As a surgical sales rep I’ve been in hundreds of medical conventions. During one of them, someone told me that my main competitor was just about to talk about their new product, so I sneaked inside the conference to find out what it was. As soon as he opened his mouth it was like seeing a car wreck in slow motion.

Out of the hour that he had, he spent the first fifteen looooong minutes talking about his degrees, his awards, he talked about the company, and by the time he got to the product, the doctors (clients) had either left, fell asleep or mentally blocked him by playing with their cellphones. I felt bad for him.

The moral of this story is that the hero is always the client. Your job as the professional is to make them look good by helping them solve their problems and fill their needs. And that’s should’ve started talking about the problem that his product promised to solve. Then he could’ve brought out the baby pictures.

 

Be the Guide, Not the Hero

The author, Donald Miller, author of the awesomeness book, Building a Story Brand, explained it perfectly. He said to think of the movie Star Wars (the trilogy that didn’t suck) . Luke is the hero who starts out lost. That’s the client. You are Obi-Wan Kenobi, and your job is to give him the tools to succeed.

So if you wanna reach the success that many never have, consider these three strategies:

 

1- Be curious.

Instead of hitting your clients over the head with details and features, take a deep breath and ask questions relevant to what you’re offering. This way you seem more as a concerned friend, and that creates massive rapport.

Let them do the talking and understand their situation. Remember that the more information you have, the easier it is to close a deal or gain influence. Plus, we all love it when someone really listens to us. But be genuine or you’ll lose their trust fast.

2- Bring Solutions.

Now that you’re clear about your clients needs, paint them a picture of how your product or service may solve their issue. Use REAL examples of past personal or client experience. Mention more benefits and less features.

Also, use the information they gave you to demonstrate how your offering eliminates their fear or pain.

3- Make a Plan.

Great managers become leaders because they help their employees become better ay what they do. On the other hand, bosses make it all about them (except when they screw something up).

Unless your employee or client is psychic, don’t assume that they know the way. Help them make the best out of their investment. Show them the ropes and help them become the heroes that they are.


About the author

Juan Santiago is a Certified Professional Coach and Master level in Neuro Linguistic Programing. He’s a professional speaker, radio personality and author of the book, ¡Lanzate! Libérate de los Miedos que te Mantienen Estancado.
Visit his website juantemotiva.com